5 Reasons Your Dog Still Pulls When Walking on a Leash

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If your dog hasn’t mastered a relaxed walk at your side, you may have made one of these five mistakes.

One of the most common reasons dog owners contact trainers is for help with walking their dogs on leash. Dogs pull for a variety of reasons — one being the fact that they have two more legs than we do. They are not pulling in some bizarro canine attempt to dominate you (please do your dog a favor and Google “dominance theory debunked”). They often pull because the human has not sufficiently or clearly communicated how he wants the dog to behave on leash. Some dogs pull and lunge, bark and growl at oncoming dogs, and that is a behavioral issue and not an obedience issue.

I want to address those dogs who yank their owners down the street in their eagerness to walk. Here are the top five reasons your dog may not have mastered a relaxed, on-leash walk with you:

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5 Tips for Engaging Your Dog’s Impressive Mind

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Does your smart dog get bored? Then keep him busy — and out of trouble — with fun activities such as nose work and simple play.

Congratulations! You have a new furry friend in your home. Within a few days or weeks of your dog adjusting to his new life, you may start to notice that he seems bored, or at least that his big brain is being underutilized.

How smart is your new companion? Some scientists and canine researchers compare the dog’s mental developments as being in the same range as a toddler’s. Dogs’ mental abilities have been compared to those of a two-to-three-year-old child.

[ Read the rest of the article at Lucky Puppy … ]

5 Tips for Engaging Your Dog’s Impressive Mind

puzzle

Does your smart dog get bored? Then keep him busy — and out of trouble — with fun activities such as nose work and simple play.

Congratulations! You have a new furry friend in your home. Within a few days or weeks of your dog adjusting to his new life, you may start to notice that he seems bored, or at least that his big brain is being underutilized.

How smart is your new companion? Some scientists and canine researchers compare the dog’s mental developments as being in the same range as a toddler’s. Dogs’ mental abilities have been compared to those of a two-to-three-year-old child.

[ Read the rest of the article at Lucky Puppy … ]

How Can I Stop My Dog’s Inappropriate Peeing?

I recently received a question from a reader:

My 16-month-old Standard Poodle, Ellie, has a problem. She is a certified therapy dog who has worked in nursing homes and also works with children in a reading program at a local library. With that said, Ellie piddles when my daughter (who happens to be a vet tech) tries to speak to her. Ellie doesn’t do this with anyone but my daughter. My daughter feels really bad. What can we do to stop this?

Poodle on toilet by Shutterstock

How Can I Stop My Dog’s Inappropriate Peeing?

I recently received a question from a reader:

My 16-month-old Standard Poodle, Ellie, has a problem. She is a certified therapy dog who has worked in nursing homes and also works with children in a reading program at a local library. With that said, Ellie piddles when my daughter (who happens to be a vet tech) tries to speak to her. Ellie doesn’t do this with anyone but my daughter. My daughter feels really bad. What can we do to stop this?

Poodle on toilet by Shutterstock

What Do Good Dentists and Good Trainers Have in Common?

 A good dentist makes me feel safe and keeps his word that he will not cause pain — and that’s exactly how a good trainer teaches a dog.

Like many of you, I hate going to the dentist.

I actually like my current dentist as a person, but I hate what his profession represents to me: pain. His name is Dr. Greg Mann, and as the world’s most patient dentist he is helping me learn to trust his kind again. He’s doing that in much the same way I help scared dogs learn to trust their environment again. I’ll explain how below; first a little more about my unlucky history with dentists.

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There Is No Reason to Use a Shock Collar. In Fact, It Should Be Illegal

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The Pet Professional Guild posted an “open letter” denouncing shock collar use, and I could not agree more.

There is no need or valid reason to shock, poke, hang, hit, or throw chains at your dog, or to spray water in his face or hurl him to the ground on his back (called an alpha roll). None. Please read that sentence again. If someone in your circle insists that a dog is attempting to “dominate” you and thus needs harsh training, please invite them to read this column as well as the “open letter” at the bottom of this column, written by one of the world’s largest groups of dog industry professionals. Please also invite them to Google “dominance theory debunked.”

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How to Ease Your New Rescue Dog Into Your Home and Life

Stability, routine, and a calm environment will help your new family member settle in.

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My husband and I fostered more than 400 dogs in need from central Texas shelters over the course of a decade. They gave me a lifetime’s worth of canine education, teaching me about the health and emotional needs of homeless dogs. In fact, I became a professional dog trainer so I could help stem the tide of unwanted pets being dumped at shelters because of behavioral issues.

[ Read the rest at Lucky Puppy … ]

Meet the Dog Zombie, Dr. Jessica Hekman

Dr. Hekman is studying the brains of dogs to help us better understand the genomics of canine behavior.

Have you heard? A dog zombie exists!

Don’t worry, I’m not talking about an undead canine who craves brains, but about scientist Dr. Jessica Hekman, who studies dog brains and goes by the nickname The Dog Zombie. She is one of those rare, highly intelligent humans who has retained a sense of humor while obtaining degree after degree after degree.

Her first degree came from Harvard University. Next she enrolled in a five-year program to obtain her DVM and a master’s degree from Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, where she had an internal dialogue about focusing on clinical medicine or research. Her interest in research won the debate, and she has been looking at the most important decision-making apparatus in dogs: the brain. Dr. Hekman is now completing her Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, studying the genomics of dog behavior.

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